Fact sheets and process guides

General Information

The NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission (the NDIS Commission) is an independent government body that works to improve the quality and safety of NDIS services and supports, investigates and resolves problems, and strengthens the skills and knowledge of providers and participants.

At full rollout, the NDIS Commission will deliver a new, nationally consistent approach to quality and safeguards in the NDIS. It will work with providers, people with disability and their carers, families and advocates to achieve this.

The following document summarises what the NDIS Commission will do for participants, providers and workers. This factsheet is also available in 11 community languages.

 

Online resource only – not available for print order.

The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) Quality and Safeguards Commission (NDIS Commission) is an independent government body that works to improve the quality and safety of NDIS services and supports.

It’s always okay to speak up.

You can contact us if you feel unsafe or unhappy with your NDIS supports or services.

The following document summarises how to make a complaint to the NDIS Commission.

Alternative versions of this brochure are also available in your language , in an Easy Read version , and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people may prefer the ‘Talk up’ version of this brochure, which is provided on this page. Braille copies are available on request – please call us on 1800 035 544 or email contactcentre@ndiscommission.gov.au

See our fact sheet for information about how we deal with complaints.

Anyone can make a complaint to the NDIS Commission about the quality and safety of NDIS services and supports.

This guide explains what happens during the complaints process, including how we deal with complaints, and how we decide what action to take.

See our fact sheet for information about how to make a complaint.

The NDIS Code of Conduct applies to all NDIS providers, registered and unregistered, and all persons employed or otherwise engaged by an NDIS provider. The NDIS Code of Conduct is also available in 11 community languages.

A new NDIS Code of Conduct has been introduced for workers under the National Disability Insurance Scheme to ensure the safety and wellbeing of people with disability.

The Code of Conduct applies to all workers and service providers delivering NDIS supports or services, including employees, contractors and volunteers.

This guide will help you, as a person who works with people with disability, to become familiar with the appropriate and ethical conduct expected under the Code of Conduct.

A snapshot of NDIS Commission provider and participant facts and figures for New South Wales and South Australia. All figures are current as of 1 July 2018.

Factsheet: NDIS Commission then and now snapshot - February 2019

The NDIS Commission works with providers to improve the quality and safety of NDIS services and supports. This fact sheet summarises what it means for providers.

Providers wishing to register under the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) need to apply for registration with the NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission (NDIS Commission).

To be registered, providers must demonstrate they meet standards of quality and safety in the services and supports they deliver.

The following document explains how NDIS providers register with the NDIS Commission.

The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) Act 2013 provides the NDIS Commission with certain powers to obtain information to assist with our investigations.

This fact sheet explains the types of matters we investigate, how we gather information to assist with investigations, as well as how and why we can compel the provision of information.

This fact sheet explains the changes to the way hearing services will be made available to NDIS participants from 1 July 2020.

From that date, only providers that are registered with the NDIS Commission will be able to deliver hearing services and equipment to NDIS participants whose plans are managed by the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA).

Self-managed participants will be able to use any provider, including those that are not registered with the NDIS Commission.

Please note that hearing services for children are not currently delivered through the NDIS. Contact the NDIA for more information about funded supports.

The fact sheet is also available in Auslan.

This fact sheet explains three new NDIS Practice Standards and new and amended Quality Indicators relating to mealtime management, severe dysphagia management and emergency and disaster management. These changes take effect from 15 November 2021, with a transition period for registered NDIS providers to comply.

This fact sheet explains the new registration condition that applies to the delivery of personal supports to participants who live alone.

The additional condition applies to registered NDIS providers delivering assistance with daily personal activities (registration group: 0107)

Coronavirus (COVID-19)

This fact sheet provides information to registered NDIS providers to support them in understanding:

  • their obligations to safely and competently provide supports and services to people with disability during the COVID-19 pandemic
  • how to reduce exposure and transmission of COVID-19
  • how to maintain NDIS supports and services.

This fact sheet provides information to NDIS participants to explain:

  • what you can expect from your NDIS providers
  • your rights
  • how to make a complaint about a provider
  • what resources are available from the NDIA
  • where to find more information and resources about COVID-19.

This fact sheet is also available in Easy Read and Auslan formats, as well as in 11 community languages.

If you are an NDIS participant who would like a Braille copy of this fact sheet, please email engagement@ndiscommission.gov.au with your name and address. It will be posted to you using the ‘Mail for the blind’ postage service.

This is an Easy Read version of the COVID-19 NDIS participant information fact sheet. It explains what the coronavirus is, how you can stay safe, what you can expect from your providers, and how you can make a complaint to us.

This fact sheet is also available in Auslan format.

This fact sheet provides information to assist NDIS providers to better understand behaviour support and restrictive practices due to COVID-19.

This fact sheet provides an update to the access to PPE information that was released on 24 March 2020 and covers:

  • When PPE should be used
  • How requests for PPE are prioritised
  • An update on the current availability of PPE in Australia.

This is an Easy Read version of the COVID-19 What NDIS participants can expect from their providers and support workers fact sheet. It explains some changes you might see in how your supports and services are delivered during COVID-19.

This fact sheet is also available in Auslan formats and 11 other languages.

This letter to NDIS providers from the Department of Home Affairs explains the temporary changes to student visa work conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic.

UPDATE: OCTOBER 2021
Student visa holders can work for more than 40 hours a fortnight if they are working for a registered National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) provider (including if they are engaged by a labour hire company or recruitment agency). More information is available on the Department of Home Affairs website.

This fact sheet contains information to support registered NDIS providers to:

  • ensure their workers take reasonable precautions to protect people with disability and themselves
  • prepare for an outbreak of COVID-19
  • respond to suspected or confirmed cases in different types of service settings
  • manage an outbreak of COVID-19.

This fact sheet uses case studies to explain some key considerations NDIS providers should bear in mind to comply with their obligations to keep NDIS participants safe from harm during the COVID-19 pandemic.

This information pack brings together the guidance and advice we issued during the COVID-19 pandemic to inform, educate and remind NDIS providers of the support available to help them meet their obligations to NDIS participants.

This information pack was originally issued in June 2020. It was updated and re-released in July 2020.

This information remains current until the risk of COVID-19 no longer exists or a vaccination is developed.

This information pack brings together the guidance we issued to help inform and support people with disability during the COVID-19 pandemic.

This information remains current until the risk of COVID-19 no longer exists or a vaccination is developed.

COVID-19 resources are also available online in Auslan and Easy read formats on our COVID-19 information for people with disability webpage.

If you are an NDIS participant who requires a Braille copy of one or both of our COVID-19 fact sheets for NDIS participants, please email engagement@ndiscommission.gov.au with your name and address. It will be posted to you using the ‘Mail for the blind’ postage service.

This fact sheet explains what we have told NDIS providers about how to help protect you from COVID-19, and what they should do if an outbreak occurs in a residential setting.

This fact sheet is also available in Easy Read and Auslan formats, and in 11 other languages.

This is an Easy Read version of the How NDIS participants can expect providers to prepare for a COVID-19 outbreak in a residential setting fact sheet. It explains what we have told NDIS providers about how to help protect you from COVID-19, and what they should do if there is an outbreak in a residential setting.

This fact sheet is also available in Auslan format, and in 11 other languages.

This fact sheet explains how to prevent the escalation of behaviours of concern and the use of restrictive practices during COVID-19 isolation. It has been developed with advice from the Australian Government Department of Health.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccines

People in residential disability accommodation are among the first group of Australians who can receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

This fact sheet is based on information from the Australian Government Department of Health (Department of Health). It contains information about the vaccination program, and explains how your provider should be preparing for it. It also contains links to resources about the vaccine. 

This fact sheet is also available in Easy Read and Auslan formats. It will soon also be available in other languages.

This is an Easy Read version of the ‘COVID-19 vaccines – Group 1a: What NDIS participants in residential disability accommodation need to know’ fact sheet. It contains information about the vaccination program, and explains how your provider should be preparing for it. It also contains links to resources about the vaccine.

This fact sheet is also available in Auslan format, and will soon also be available in other languages.

This fact sheet aims to assist NDIS providers to better understand their obligations when supporting people with disability to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

It contains information about:

  • the COVID-19 vaccines rollout from the Department of Health
  • provider obligations
  • informed consent
  • preparing for the COVID-19 vaccine, including consulting with participants and supporting them to prepare for their vaccination
  • the use of regulated restrictive practices, including state and territory requirements and contacts for authorisation.

This factsheet, issued by the Department of Health, includes the following information and advice: 

  • Phase 1a webinar: Thursday 4 March, 2021 
  • Phase 1a COVID-19 vaccine data collection 
  • Disability Provider COVID-19 Vaccine Readiness Toolkit
  • Vaccine eligibility checker.

This factsheet contains the following information and advice: 

  • Providers involved with the first week of Phase 1a vaccinations have been contacted by the Department of Health.
  • The Department of Health will contact you to discuss preparing your disability accommodation residence for vaccinations, but there are steps you can take now.
  • Providers are encouraged to talk to the people with disability you support and your workers about getting vaccinated.
  • The Department of Health website has a range of resources about the COVID-19 vaccines. These resources include Easy Read and Auslan resources for people with disability. 

NDIS Worker Screening Check and Database

This fact sheet for general stakeholders explains what the NDIS Worker Screening Check is and why it is important. 

We have also published a glossary of terms that are commonly used regarding worker screening.

This fact sheet is also available as an Auslan video.

This fact sheet is for registered residential aged care providers supporting NDIS participants in their facilities and that transitioned to registration with the NDIS Commission on 1 December 2020. 

It explains what the NDIS Worker Screening Check is, how it works, and what it means for you and your workers. It also includes contact details for Worker Screening Units. 

If you are a residential aged care provider who supports NDIS participants and you were registered with the NDIS Commission before 1 December 2020, please review the fact sheet called ‘NDIS Worker Screening Check: What registered NDIS providers need to know’. 

We have also published a glossary of terms that are commonly used regarding worker screening.

This fact sheet explains what worker screening is, and how the Worker Screening Check will be useful to you and other self-managed participants.

This fact sheet is also available as an Auslan video, in Easy Read format, and in other languages.

We have also published a fact sheet for self-managed participants about the NDIS Worker Screening Database.

To help you understand some of the terms we use when talking about worker screening, we have published a list on our website.

This fact sheet explains what the NDIS Worker Screening Database is, and how to use it.

This fact sheet is also available as an Auslan video, in Easy Read format, and in other languages.

We have also published a fact sheet fact sheet explains what worker screening is, and how the Worker Screening Check will be useful to you and other self-managed participants. 

To help you understand some of the terms we use when talking about worker screening, we have published a list on our website.

This fact sheet for NDIS workers explains what the NDIS Worker Screening Check is, how it works, and how to apply for one. It also includes contact details for Worker Screening Units.

We have also published a glossary of terms that are commonly used regarding worker screening.

This fact sheet describes the work on application arrangements including what supervision arrangements must be in place.

This flowchart explains how the NDIS Worker Screening Check affects unregistered NDIS providers.

This flowchart explains the process involved with applying for an NDIS Worker Screening Check

This flowchart explains the worker screening checks or clearances that must be in place if you are a registered NDIS provider supporting NDIS participants with workers in risk assessed roles. 

Incident management and reportable incidents

Under the NDIS Commission, registered providers must have an incidents management system in place to record and manage incidents (including allegations) that occur while providing supports and services to people with a disability.

All providers, registered and unregistered, must also have an in-house complaints management and resolution system and support participants to make a complaint.

This document provides guidance on the reporting of incidents and complaints in Western Australia before, and from 1 December 2020.

NDIS providers must notify the NDIS Commission about a reportable incident that occurs, or is alleged to have occurred, in connection with the NDIS supports or services you deliver.

This fact sheet has information about the reportable incident obligations and incident management system requirements for managers and key personnel of registered NDIS providers.

Effective incident management is essential to providing quality and safe disability supports and services.

This fact sheet is a guide for managers and supervisors about the benefits of good incident management practices for NDIS participants and your business.

All NDIS providers are to have incident management systems in place. This fact sheet explains key requirements of incident management systems and the reporting obligations on registered NDIS providers for certain types of incidents.

Registered NDIS service providers are required to notify us when certain incidents occur. This fact sheet explains the types of incidents that registered NDIS providers are required to report to the NDIS Commission. This obligation does not alter any existing obligations providers may have to report incidents state or territory authorities and police.

Registered NDIS providers must keep good records and provide the right information about notifiable incidents to the NDIS Commission. This fact sheet explains the record keeping obligations on NDIS providers about incidents, and details the information the NDIS Commission requires registered NDIS providers to provide when notifying us of a reportable incident.

Participants have the right to feel safe and there are rules for registered NDIS providers to make sure this happens. This fact sheet tells participants what the NDIS Commission expects providers to do when an incident happens and who may need to be told about an incident. It also explains what the NDIS Commission expects providers to do to support participants to feel safe if they have been impacted by an incident.

Under the NDIS Commission, registered providers must have an incidents management system in place to record and manage incidents (including allegations) that occur while providing supports and services to people with a disability.

All providers, registered and unregistered, must also have an in-house complaints management and resolution system and support participants to make a complaint.

This document provides guidance on the reporting of incidents and complaints in the Australian Capital Territory prior to, and from 1 July 2019.

Under the NDIS Commission, registered providers must have an incidents management system in place to record and manage incidents (including allegations) that occur while providing supports and services to people with a disability.

All providers, registered and unregistered, must also have an in-house complaints management and resolution system and support participants to make a complaint.


This document provides guidance on the reporting of incidents and complaints in the Northern Territory prior to, and from 1 July 2019.

Under the NDIS Commission, registered providers must have an incidents management system in place to record and manage incidents (including allegations) that occur while providing supports and services to people with a disability.

All providers, registered and unregistered, must also have an in-house complaints management and resolution system and support participants to make a complaint.

This document provides guidance on the reporting of incidents and complaints in Queensland prior to, and from 1 July 2019.

Registered NDIS providers are required by Commonwealth law to have appropriate systems in place to respond to any incidents that occur or are alleged to have occurred in connection with the provision of supports or services to NDIS participants. The Government of South Australia also requires NDIS providers to notify them of certain types of incidents.

From 1 July 2018, providers who are in receipt of funding from the Government of South Australia and the NDIS may be subject to both state based and NDIS Commission reporting obligations.

This document provides guidance on the reporting of incidents in South Australia prior to and since 1 July 2018.

Under the NDIS Commission, registered providers must have an incidents management system in place to record and manage incidents (including allegations) that occur while providing supports and services to people with a disability.

All providers, registered and unregistered, must also have an in-house complaints management and resolution system and support participants to make a complaint.

This document provides guidance on the reporting of incidents and complaints in Tasmania prior to, and from 1 July 2019.

Under the NDIS Commission, registered providers must have an incidents management system in place to record and manage incidents (including allegations) that occur while providing supports and services to people with a disability.

All providers, registered and unregistered, must also have an in-house complaints management and resolution system and support participants to make a complaint.

This document provides guidance on the reporting of incidents and complaints in Victoria prior to, and from 1 July 2019.

Practice Review Guidance Materials

What is a practice review?

What is a practice review (easy read)?

Practice reviews contribute to safeguarding, and improving the standard of support provided to people with disability.

The Practice Review Framework provides an overview of a practice review, and maps how to integrate these with existing quality management and continuous improvement activities. It provides a suite of informed and practical resources and tools that can be used by all NDIS providers of varying size, purpose, and maturity.

The following fact sheets define and describe practice reviews:

  • Practice Review Framework
  • What is a practice review?
  • What is a practice review? (Easy Read)
  • Information for family, carers, and participant supporters

These documents are part of a series of resources about practice reviews, and should be read with other NDIS Commission practice review guidance materials.

Practice reviews are one activity in the continuum of continuous improvement activities NDIS providers use.

The following fact sheet describes the most common continuous improvement activities performed by NDIS providers, and explains where practice reviews fit in with these activities:

  • The continuous improvement continuum

It includes a case study that illustrates how these activities complement and interact with each other.

This fact sheet is part of a series of resources about practice reviews, and should be read with other NDIS Commission practice review guidance materials.

You can introduce practice reviews as part of your organisation’s continuous improvement strategies. A practice review culture can become part of your organisation’s mission and goals, and involve all levels of your organisation.

The following fact sheets explain what can trigger a practice review.

  • Building a practice review culture
  • Indicators and triggers for practice reviews

These fact sheets are part of a series of resources about practice reviews, and should be read with other NDIS Commission practice review guidance materials.

How to do a practice review

A practice review is usually led by a designated reviewer. When you structure a practice review, you need to decide who should lead it, who should participate, and if it should be simple or complex.

Refer to the following fact sheets:

  • Identifying people to participate in a practice review
  • Who should lead a practice review?

These fact sheets are part of a series of resources about practice reviews, and should be read with other NDIS Commission practice review guidance materials.

Practice reviews require the participation of a broad range of stakeholders and should encourage recommendations for improvement.

Refer to the following fact sheets:

  • Consulting with people with disability during a practice review
  • Engaging people in practice reviews
  • How to do a practice review
  • Questions and prompts to use in a practice review with people with disability

These fact sheets are part of a series of resources about practice reviews, and should be read with other NDIS Commission practice review guidance materials.

Reflection is an important part of performing practice reviews. Performing reflection exercises is one way to help you address any complex issues that have arisen during the practice review.

Refer to the following fact sheets:

  • Reflection exercise for decision makers
  • Reflection exercise for practice review participants
  • Reflection exercise for reviewers

These fact sheets are part of a series of resources about practice reviews, and should be read with other NDIS Commission practice review guidance materials.

Information for family, carers, and participant supporters

Indicators and triggers

Identifying people to participate in practice reviews

Practice reviews require the participation of a broad range of stakeholders and should encourage recommendations for improvement.

Refer to the following fact sheets:

  • Consulting with people with disability during a practice review
  • Engaging people in practice reviews
  • How to do a practice review
  • Questions and prompts to use in a practice review with people with disability

These fact sheets are part of a series of resources about practice reviews, and should be read with other NDIS Commission practice review guidance materials.

Questions and prompts to use in a practice review with people with disability

Reflection exercise for practice review participants

Reflection exercise for reviewers

Behaviour Support

This fact sheet outlines requirements for providers who use restrictive practices and providers who write behaviour support plans.

This flow chart and interactive decision tree have been developed to assist participants and their families identify the types of supports that only a registered NDIS provider can deliver. They also identify the options available when an unregistered provider is currently involved and using a regulated restrictive practice.

Statements

This fact sheet explains the joint statement from the Aged Care Quality and Safety Commission (ACQSC), the NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission (NDIS Commission) and the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care (ACSQHC) is about the important issue of inappropriate use of psychotropic medicines among people with disability and older people, and the commitment to collaborative action to reduce it.

This easy read fact sheet explains the joint statement from the Aged Care Quality and Safety Commission (ACQSC), the NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission (NDIS Commission) and the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care (ACSQHC) is about the important issue of inappropriate use of psychotropic medicines among people with disability and older people, and the commitment to collaborative action to reduce it.

Then and now for providers

The NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission (NDIS Commission) is an independent government body that works to improve the quality and safety of NDIS services and supports, investigates and resolves problems, and strengthens the skills and knowledge of providers and participants.

The NDIS Commission commenced operating in New South Wales on 1 July 2018.

The NDIS Commission introduced several changes for New South Wales providers which are summarised here.

The NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission (NDIS Commission) is an independent government body that works to improve the quality and safety of NDIS services and supports, investigates and resolves problems, and strengthens the skills and knowledge of providers and participants.

The NDIS Commission commenced operating in the Northern Territory on 1 July 2019.

The NDIS Commission introduces several changes for Northern Territory providers, which are summarised here.

The NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission (NDIS Commission) is an independent government body that works to improve the quality and safety of NDIS services and supports, investigates and resolves problems, and strengthens the skills and knowledge of providers and participants.

The NDIS Commission commenced operating in South Australia on 1 July 2018.

The NDIS Commission introduced several changes for South Australia providers which are summarised here.

The NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission (NDIS Commission) is an independent government body that works to improve the quality and safety of NDIS services and supports, investigates and resolves problems, and strengthens the skills and knowledge of providers and participants.

The NDIS Commission commenced operating in Queensland on 1 July 2019.

The NDIS Commission introduces several changes for Queensland providers, which are summarised here.

The NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission (NDIS Commission) is an independent government body that works to improve the quality and safety of NDIS services and supports, investigates and resolves problems, and strengthens the skills and knowledge of providers and participants.

The NDIS Commission commenced operating in Tasmania on 1 July 2019.

The NDIS Commission introduces several changes for Tasmanian providers, which are summarised here.

The NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission (NDIS Commission) is an independent government body that works to improve the quality and safety of NDIS services and supports, investigates and resolves problems, and strengthens the skills and knowledge of providers and participants.

The NDIS Commission commenced operating in Victoria on 1 July 2019.

The NDIS Commission introduces several changes for Victorian providers, which are summarised here.

The NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission (NDIS Commission) is an independent government body that works to improve the quality and safety of NDIS services and supports, investigates and resolves problems, and strengthens the skills and knowledge of providers and participants.

The NDIS Commission commenced operating in Western Australia on 1 December 2020.

The NDIS Commission introduces several changes for WA providers, which are summarised here.